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War Stories

cobra Centaur Aircraft Tail Numbers - AH-1G

by Michael Peake
select aircraft...AH-1G..... OH-23.....OH-6A.....UH-1C.....UH-1D.....UH-1H.....Other

AH-1G Cobra Gunships - see photos
AC Model Tail Number Buy Date Begin Unit Begin Hours Finish In Unit Finish Hours Total Hours Remarks (note: MASN = Military Aircraft Serial Numbers-1908 to Present)
AH-1G

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67-15540 368 6808 100 6904 496 396 Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 67-15540 named "Crazy Bruce" D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1968-69, with SP5 Warren H. Waite crew chief, CPT Bruce A. Powell Aircraft Commander and CW2 Clay Maxwell copilot. Centaur 40 Bruce Powell states "I went to Vung Tau and picked up the first Cobra (540) to arrive for the Division on 30 May. I test flew it after it was unloaded and assemled from the Corpus Christi Bay ship. I flew 1.3 hours that day. Damn near wrecked the thing trying to do all those test pilot maneuvers." MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15540 converted to AH-1F. This aircraft ended up in Hawaii.
AH-1G 67-15542 368 6808 132 6811 278 146 D Troop. "At approximately 0745 on 13 December 1968, WO Clay Maxwell, aircraft commander, and WO1 Scott B.Moore, pilot, of the AH-1 G Cobra, SN 67-15542, departed Cu Chi on a routine VR mission along with a LOH (OH-6 A) piloted by WO Pooch Johnston. Both pilot and ac had previously pre-flighted the aircraft and found no discrepancies to preclude safe flight. The mission consisted of a visual low level reconnaissance by the LOH while the AH-1 G Gunship orbited overhead at approximately 2,000 feet to provide cover in a case the LOH received enemy fire and to direct the LOH into areas of possible interest. The two aircraft departed Cu Chi and arrived at the recon area without incident. After about 15 minutes on station, the first indication of malfunction occurred. WO Scott B. Moore, the pilot was flying the aircraft at approximately 2000 feet in a shallow right hand orbit with an airspeed of 90-100 knots. The pilot heard a "thump" and felt the aircraft start to yaw to the right and was unable to obtain corrective response with the anti-torque pedals. Both pilot and aircraft commander heard the unusual sound and observed some unrecognizable object passing through the air at the right side of the aircraft. The aircraft commander, WO Maxwell assumed control of the aircraft and attempted to trim the aircraft with pedals but was unsuccessful. He analyzed the problem as a loss of anti-torque control. WO Maxwell elected to make a left hand 180 degree turn whereby he could touch down on the open highway that paralleled his flight path approximately 800-1000 meters to his left. At the same time he called the OH-6A aircraft and informed the pilot that he was in trouble and going down. Mr. Maxwell found that he was unable to make the aircraft turn to the left in a coordinated turn but rather that the aircraft tried to slide around to the left while the nose still yawed to the right. The ac then decided to bring the aircraft around to the right. As soon as the aircraft was partially controllable and in a right descending turn he entered autorotation and found the aircraft responded by descending more rapidly approaching the ground and Mr. Maxwell attempted to execute a flare and pulled full collective pitch prior to impact. The aircraft struck the ground in a slightly nose low-right yaw attitude with an extremely high rate of descent that resulted in no ground run or forward motion after impact. The aircraft commander turned off fuel and battery and exited the aircraft to help the pilot get out. The aircraft engine continued to operate for 15-30 seconds with no resultant fire. The pilot, WO1 Scott B. Moore, observed that the indicated airspeed throughout the right hand descent was approximately 50 knots. The main rotor blades flexed down at impact and struck the ground at the right and left of the aircraft and immediately tore apart into numerous sections. The tail boom flexed down and severed approximately 3 feet back of the main body section. As a result of the g-forces experienced at impact both the pilot and aircraft commander received spinal injuries and all major components of the aircraft were extensively damaged."
AH-1G

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67-15546 368 7006 1265 7102 1772 507 D Troop/F Troop. "Mississippi Queen." MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15546 had been converted to AH-1S and noted on display at Ozark Military Museum, Fayetteville, Arkansas.
AH-1G 67-15551 368 6808 97 7002 1289 1192 D Troop. Ft. Campbell. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15551 converted to AH-1F.

AH-1G

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67-15552 368   130 6808     D Troop. 08/18/1968 Accident case number: 680818051: Total Operational Loss caused by Accident. At approximately 0215 hours, the aircraft departed Cu Chi as the lead aircraft of a two gunship light fire team. The trail aircraft was a UH-1C. Approximately 20 kilometers from Tay Ninh City, the aircraft commander made radio contact with the supported unit and received grid coordinates, call signs and radio frequencies which he was to use during the mission. From the time of the aircraft's departure from Cu Chi base camp, the crew members state, the weather was marginal with a ceiling of approximately 1000 feet. They also state the cloud ceiling lowered approximately one half the distance to the objective area, forcing them to 700 - 800 feet of altitude. After receiving the coordinates, frequencies and call signs, the aircraft commander turned the controls of the aircraft over to CPT Moose Marcinkowski, so he could plot the coordinates on his map and then change radio frequencies. After making one change in directional heading to avoid impacting artillery, CPT Marcinkowski states he set the aircraft on a heading 270 degrees and placed the distance lights of Tay Ninh City at his 12 o'clock position. Both pilots state that during this time they were flying through a light rain. After several minutes of working with his maps in the rear seat of the aircraft, the aircraft commander replaced his maps in the cockpit and started changing radio frequencies to the designated frequencies. It was at this time he noticed the altimeter of the aircraft was reading between 100 and 200 feet of altitude. Realizing the terrain near Tay Ninh City was approximately 100 feet of elevation, CW2 Tom Meeks reacted instantly by assuming control of the aircraft, notifying CPT Marcinkowski, that he had control of the aircraft at the same time he took control, and immediately executing a cyclic climb. During these few seconds, the aircraft struck the large rubber trees of the rubber plantation in a nose high attitude. Continuing to execute a climb out, the aircraft continued to drag in the dense tree tops in a nose high attitude for a short period and then ascended a few feet above the trees. At this time the aircraft commander attempted to continue to fly the aircraft and gain altitude by increasing collective pitch. The crewmembers stated the aircraft began to shudder and shake violently with pitch application and to lose operating RPM. Again reacting instantly, the aircraft commander executed a cyclic flare and reduced collective pitch, zeroing out forward airspeed and allowing the aircraft to settle into the trees in a tail low attitude. The settling impact of the aircraft was partially cushioned by the dense tree top canopy of the rubber trees. During the initial impact of the aircraft into the trees and the subsequent flight path through the tree tops, CPT Marcinkowski, the pilot, suffered corneal abrasions of both eyes, causing by the shattered canopy, minor cuts to the face and a bruised leg. Hear the story MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15551 converted to AH-1F.
AH-1G

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67-15554 368 6808 77 6812 269 192 D Troop. Centaur 63 CW2 Craig L. Peterson, Slick Pilot D Troop 1968-69, provides photograph of AH-1G 67-15554 Cobra Revetment Crash January 1969. Dale Dow’s Centaur Aircraft 66-73 Excel Database #2 shows AH-1G, 67-15554, Helicopter was parked at Cu Chi Base Camp in a revetment at 3/4 Cav “D” Troops parking area. Lt. Lund, test pilot for Co “E,” 725th Maintenance Battalion, was summoned by “D” Troop, 3/4 Cav to check their AH-1G Helicopter (1554) for “rpm bleed-off.” This was written up in the -13. Lt. Lund, with his mechanic, checked out the aircraft and decided to test fly the aircraft in a clear area to the left front of the revetment. There was a rear quartering tail wind from the left side of the aircraft. The pilot elected to have the aircraft out of the revetment. Upon lifting the aircraft off the ground, the pilot experienced the tail swinging to the left. The pilot then tried to keep directional control by counteracting with the pedal-this seemed to have no effect. At this point, the aircraft came to an approximate 20 feet hover. From here the aircraft started its 360 degree turns to the right. After a 270 degree turn, it seemed that the pilot was in control of the aircraft. But this control lasted only momentarily, for the aircraft started its 360 degree turns to the right at nose low attitude. After two or three complete revolutions and bleeding off the rpm, the aircraft settled in with the left side striking the ground first. Upon impact, the left skid collapsed causing damage to the skid, gun turret, rocker pods, and “sync-elevator.” After impact, the pilot shut down the aircraft and both the pilot and mechanic exited the aircraft unharmed. Bruce Dragonjac MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15554 (235 Avn) in midair collision with OH-6A 68-11055 in Cambodia May 2, 1970.
AH-1G

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67-15567 468 7003 366 7102 1174 808

D Troop/F Troop. “The Henchman II.” ”This is Gary Schmidt's second Cobra named Henchman II at Chu Chi. Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 67-15567 named “The Henchman II,” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71, with SP4 Gary M. Schmidt crew chief and Charles Sullivan Aircraft Commander. see the model We have no Charles Sullivan listed. Could it be Marty? MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15567 converted to TAH-1F, then redesignated AH-1F.

AH-1G

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67-15652             F Troop. "Nixon's Hired Gun" SP5 Linford E "Lin" Riniker, Armament Repairman F Troop 1972, provides photograph of AH-1G 67-15652 sitting in revetment at Long Binh. AH-1G Cobra 67-15652 is not listed on the VHPA chart of identified Centaur aircraft. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15652 converted to AH-1F.
AH-1G 67-15667 768 6808 15 6910 964 964 D Troop. 8/11/69" In Memoriam shows Captain Robert Andrew Clements and W01 Alexander C. Brown died in the crash. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15667 4 Cavalry the tail and the main rotor separated inflight and crashed Hau Nghia Province, SVN November 23, 1969. Both crew KIA. Aircraft was on a visual reconnaissance mission. At approximately 0630 hours the light scout team, consisting of AH-1G 67-15669 and an observation helicopter, departed Cu Chi Base Camp on their visual reconnaissance mission. The team proceeded west to Fire Support Base Jackson located at XT 425168. As they passed south of Fire Support Base Jackson, the AH-1G commander observed some small fires southwest of their location. The AH-1G aircraft commander instructed his observation helicopter pilot to continue in a westerly direction while he proceeded to determine the significance of the small fires. At this time, the AH-1G was at approximately 600 feet. He turned toward the southwest and proceeded toward the area which contained the fires. As he arrived over the area, he made a non-firing dive to approximately 300 feet. During the dive he started a left hand turn to bring him back to the area his observation helicopter had proceeded. It is assumed he had ascertained that the fires were of no tactical value and was going to rejoin his wingman. As he started his turn back to the north, witnesses describe an explosion and what appeared to be the observation helicopter falling away to the west. This object was, in fact, the main rotor head and rotor blades which separated from the aircraft. Immediately prior to this event, the tail rotor separated from the aircraft causing the nose to pitch sharply downward and to the right from loss of anti-torque control and center of gravity. At the instant the tail rotor separated from the aircraft, it is suspected the pilot over compensated for the aircraft yaw and loss of center of gravity with a violent cyclic maneuver. This violent maneuver induced severe mast bumping, which, in turn, caused the main rotor head to separate from the mast. It is also possible that the pilot immediately reduced collective when the tail rotor failure occurred causing the rotor head to lose its load forces. This, in turn would induce severe mast bumping and loss of the rotor head. As a consequence of the loss of the rotor head, the aircraft plummeted to the ground where its fuel and ordnance caused an explosion and fire which destroyed the aircraft."
AH-1G 67-15772 1068 6812 3 6909 755 752 D Troop. Returned to Ft Hood. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15772 converted to AH-1F and now display at American Legion Post #81, Wakefield, Nebraska.

AH-1G

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67-15776 1068 6812 0 7102 1937 1937 D Troop/F Troop. Returned to Ft Lewis.“Betty Boobs.” SP4 Daniel M. Coles, Cobra Crew Chief D Troop and F Troop 1970-71, served as crew chief for AH-1G 67-15776. Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 67-15776 named “Betty Boobs,” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71, with SP4 Daniel M. Coles crew chief and (Centaur 51) CW2 Bruce W. Sikkema Aircraft Commander with a second listing showing AH-1G 67-15776 named "The Undertaker" and no year provided. My Page shows CW2 Bruce W. Sikkema, Centaur 51, was pilot of AH-1G Cobra #67-15776 during his tour from December 1969 to June 1971. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15776 now on static display outside Fort Irwin, California.
AH-1G 67-15797 1068 6901 101 6905 244 243

D Troop. Late 1969, Aircraft used to rescue LOH crew using bay doors of the Cobra. see TLN article. Ray Clark remembers about nine 51 cal holes in the Cobra not three. Later, at 5000 feet on test flight CPT William Malinovsky had a violent shudder of the aircraft. Pilot thought aircraft had Stability Augmentation System hard over he punched of the SCAS & returned to straight & level flight. Rotor rpm started to climb & was beeped down to limits. Pilot experienced violent vertical vibration. Pilot landed aircraft & inspection revealed mast had bumped twice & one blade warped pilot did not know when mast bumping occurred. By some miracle he got it back to the Corral. Bell helicopter representatives came out, looked at the bird and put it in a virtual plastic bag to take back to the factory. see story MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15797 converted to AH-1F and noted in storage at Fort Drum, New York May 21, 2001

AH-1G 67-15799 1068 6812 0 6907 499 499 D Troop. Transferred to another Unit and crashed. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15799 (235 AVN) flew into ground at night in bad weather Chuong Thien Province, SVN December 16, 1969.
AH-1G

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67-15820 1168 6901 5 7006 1459 1454 D Troop. "Ohio Express." Transferred to another Unit and crashed. SP5 Jack M. Nemeyer, crew chief of “Pinball Wizard” D Troop 1969-70, provides photograph of hanger crew pulling maintenance on AH-1G Cobra #67-15820 "Ohio Express" in late 1969. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15820 (175 AHC) crashed Vinh Binh Province, SVN March 29, 1971.
AH-1G 67-15825 1168 6901 0 7102 1879 1879 D Troop/F Troop. Returned to Ft Lewis. “Warlord.” Dale Dow’s Centaur Aircraft 66-73 Excel Database #2 shows aircraft named “Warlord.” Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 67-15825 “Warlord,” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71.
AH-1G

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67-15827 1168 6901 0 7002 1055 1055 D Troop. “The Henchman.” SP4 Gary M. Schmidt , AH-1G Cobra crew chief D & F Troops 1970-71, provides photograph of AH-1G 67-15827 undergoing maintenance in a hanger. Schmidt, crew chief of AH-1G Cobra 67-15567 “The Henchman II,” states that “The Henchman one (67-15827 my first ship) was shot down and autorotated into a rice paddy, No injuries.” Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 67-15827 “The Henchman (#1),” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1969-70 with WO1 Tom Olssen Aircraft Commander. MASN for 1967 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 67-15827 converted to AH-1S. Returned to Ft Bragg.
AH-1G 67-15858 1268 6903 0 7004 1205 1205 D Troop. Dale Dow’s Centaur Aircraft 66-73 Excel Database #2 shows AH-1G 67-15858 named “Affectionally Yours.” This may have been the aircraft CW2 J. L. "Jake" Walters and WO1 Wayne E. Hooper's crashed. His MyPage shows Wayne Hooper was Centaur 43. Centaur 43 Cobra pilot WO1 Wayne E. Hooper recalls that AH-1G 67-15858 flew as "one of the best" in the Centaur fleet thanks to the efforts of Centaur 47 CW2 Kenneth Lee "Strange" Strand and his crew chief, who together "had it tuned like a fine watch...She was a fine ship." Unable to be recovered, the aircraft, known as "Affectionally Yours," was totally destroyed and classified as "Lost to Inventory." see the story by Wayne Hooper
AH-1G

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68-15012             F Troop. "#1 Du Me Mi." Flown by CW2 Ken Mick (aircraft commander), Hue-Phu Bai, late 1972. The advent of the shoulder-launched, heat-seeking SA-7 “Strela” SAM posed such a threat to all helicopters in 1972 that U. S. forces hastily initiated a series of modifications to increase the survivability of their aircraft in South Vietnam. With the AH-1, these “mods” took the form of a “toilet bowl” exhaust and auxiliary scoops on the engine intakes in order to match the heat signature generated by the engine from the SA-7. By mid-1972 priority was given to retrofitting “Strela” suppression kits to all combat helicopters. The garishly decorated AH-1 68-15012 was among the first Cobras to receive the suppression kit [Vietnam Helicopters and Their Crews, Jonathan Bernstein and Gordon Rottman, Osprey Publishing LTD (2007), page 90-91]. Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 68-15012 "#1 Du Me Mi," F Troop, 4th Cavalry, 1972, with CW2 Ken Mick Aircraft Commander. MASN for 1968 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 68-15012 converted to AH-1S.
AH-1G
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68-15110             D Troop/F Troop. "Centaur Max" F Troop 1971 Lai Khe Vietnam Yearbook shows images AH-1G Cobra #68-15110. You might see the Blue Max symbol behind the Centaur logo. CPT Don Borey says "We got the aircraft from the Blue Max ( I think they were the 334th  ARA),  When F Troop got alerted to move north in Jun or Jul 1971, we turned in our high time ships and were given some helicopters that had more time on them before major inspections.  110 was one of the cobras we received.  My crew chief SP5 Keith Nicol and I painted the shark teeth on the nose. He painted the Centaur on the doghouse but he couldn't get any OD paint to cover up the Blue Max that the 334th painted. We referred to 110 as "Centaur Max".  We ended up not going North and stayed in Lai Khe until Jan 1972 when we moved back to Long Binh.". MASN for 1968 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 68-15110 converted to AH-1F, noted in storage at Fort Drum, New York May 21, 2001. Has left Fort Drum and is now preserved at American Legion Post #1376, New Hartford, New York.
AH-1G

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68-15126 469 6906 1 7102 1502 1501 D Troop/F Troop. Went to NASA.“Rosemary's Baby.” SP4 Gary M. Schmidt, AH-1G Cobra crew chief D & F Troops 1970-71, provides photograph of AH-1G #68-15125 "Rosemary's Baby" in caption but photograph clearly shows Tail Number 126. Dale Dow’s Centaur Aircraft 66-73 Excel Database #2 shows AH-1G 68-15126 named “Rosemary's Baby.” MASN for 1968 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 68-15126 converted to AH-1S.
AH-1G

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68-15135 569 6908 1 7102 1614 1613 AH-1G 68-15135 The Kansas Killer” 1LT John L. Taylor, Cobra Pilot D Troop and F Troop 1970-71, provides image of AH-1G 68-15135 “The Kansas Killer,” belonging to Captain Rudy Parris, undergoing maintenance by unidentified crew chief with Captains Don Phillips and Wiley Cranney. Carl Betsill provided photograph of AH-1G 68-15135 with name “The Kansas Killer.” Carl Betsill provided photograph of AH-1G 68-15135 with name “The Kansas Killer.” Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 68-15135 named “The Kansas Killer,” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71 with SGT. Don Vaughn crew chief, CPT Rudy Parris Aircraft Commander (Mr. Brennan also states AH-1G 68-15135 was named California Dreamin', D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71 with SGT. Don Vaughan crew chief, CPT Rudy Parris Aircraft Commander). MASN for 1967 shows: Hughes OH-6A Cayuse 16135 assigned to D Troop, 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment. Named “California Dreaming” [right side]; “Kansas Killer” [on left side of pylon]; Assigned to A Troop, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division September 1969-February 1970; Shot down February 24, 1970, Quang Tri Province, RVN. The aircraft was flying interference for Dustoff when it received heavy automatic weapons fire, crashed and burned.
AH-1G

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68-15189 769 6911 1 7102 1375 1374 D Troop/F Troop. "Wretched Mildred" ended up with NASA.
AH-1G 68-15197 769 7110 1341 7112 1567 226 F Troop. MASN for 1968 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 68-15197 converted to AH-1S.

AH-1G

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68-15201 869 7110 1142 7112 1413 271 F Troop. "RC II" Centaur 54 CW2 Robert "Bob" Jones, Cobra pilot F Troop 1971-72, provides photograph of AH-1G 68-15201 "RC II" sitting in revetment at Lai Kai 1971 and a second image showing troops examining the aircraft on its arrival in the unit earlier in 1971.
AH-1G

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68-17040 969 6912 1 7102 1347 1346

D Troop/F Troop. “Kentucky Woman.” SP5 Jack M. Nemeyer, crew chief of “Pinball Wizard” D Troop 1969-70, provides photograph of AH-1G Cobra #68-17040 “Kentucky Woman” in revetment late 1969 brandishing M159 19-shot 2.75 inch rocket pods mounted outboard, two M18A1 7.62mm minigun pods mounted inboard and the M28A1 turret in hybrid configuration of right hand minigun and left hand 40mm grenade launcher. Author John Brennan, Vietnam Aircraft Nose Art, provides listing showing AH-1G 68-17040 named “Kentucky Woman,” D Troop, 3/4 Cavalry, 1970-71, with John W. Brady crew chief.

Kentucky Woman lives at American Legion 65 in Statesville, NC see video

MASN for 1968 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 68-17040 converted to AH-1F now on display at American Legion Post #65, Statesville, North Carolina.

AH-1G 68-17107 170 7003 0 7102 1024 1024 D Troop/F Troop. "Lady Godiva." This is the first aircraft mounting the M35 20mm Armament Subsystem. In Memoriam Page shows that Captain Marvin E. Runyon, who died August 11, 2019, flew AH-1G Cobra #68-17107 “Lady Godiva” mounted with 20mm cannon.
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69-16439            

F Troop. Originally flown by DFC-winner CW2 Dave Tela, A/3/17 Cav, Di An, AH-1G 69-16439 is yet another 20mm cannon-modified Cobra that saw extensive combat in Cambodia in May-June 1970. It was reassigned to C/2/17 Cav in June 1971 and then F/4 Cav in early 1972, before finally return into the U. S. after the cease-fire. Configured as a "super scout," 69-16439 carried three XM-158 seven-shot pods along with the 20mm cannon. After assignment to F Troop to become the second 20mm armed Centaur Cobra, armorers replaced the right side inboard seven-shot pod with a 19-shot M-200 rocket pod and configured the nose turret, that previously held twin miniguns, with "B," or Hybrid, configuration of right hand minigun and left hand 40mm grenade launcher.

John Mackey, CPT 1971-72 says:" I flew 439 several times. Shot up a convoy along the tripple nickel. The gunner always had to hold his door shut."

Someone mentioned that Richard Parrish had the aircraft in 1971-72 and turned it over to Paul Martindale some time in 1972. MASN for 1969 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 69-16439 converted to AH-1F. Noted in storage at Fort Drum, New York, May 21, 2001.

AH-1G 70-16022 372 7205 0 7207 88 88 F Troop. MASN for 1970 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 70-16022 sent to Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo, Iowa.
AH-1G 70-16028 472 7206 3 7207 62 59 F Troop. MASN for 1970 shows: Bell AH-1G Cobra 70-16028 converted to AH-1S.

NOTE: All data acquired from images found in the Centaur List of Photo Albums, Slide Shows, Yearbooks, My Page entries and Rosters War Stories Essays/Discussions, are cross referenced with chart provided by VHPA found in War Stories Discussions-Centaur Aircraft Tail Numbers augmented by a database of unknown origin provided by Tom Dooling.

Also check out Aircraft Names without tail numbers and the Aircraft History Section - see just photos